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Effects of calcium channel blockers on perioperative ischemic events in hypertensive patients with intracranial aneurysms undergoing neurointervention.

BACKGROUND: Although calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are useful in stroke prevention, their specific role in preventing stroke in hypertensive patients with intracranial aneurysms undergoing endovascular stent placement remains unclear.

METHODS: We retrospectively examined 458 hypertensive patients with intracranial aneurysms who underwent stent treatment, drawn from a larger multicenter cohort comprising 1326 patients across eight centers. Patients were dichotomized into two groups according to use of a CCB. Propensity score matching (PSM) was performed to balance group differences in patient and aneurysm characteristics. We conducted a comparison of patient and aneurysm characteristics, ischemic complications, and clinical outcomes between the two groups.

RESULTS: The CCB and non-CCB groups comprised 279 and 179 patients, respectively. PSM resulted in 165 matched pairs. After PSM, the incidence of ischemic events within 1 month of the procedure (4.2% vs 10.9%; P=0.022) and proportion of patients with modified Rankin Scale score >2 at last follow-up (1.5% vs 7.8%; P=0.013) were significantly lower in the CCB group. Among patients treated with combination therapy, inclusion of a CCB was associated with a lower incidence of ischemic events (1.5% vs 13.3%; P=0.345), but the difference was not statistically significant after correction.

CONCLUSIONS: CCB use in hypertensive patients undergoing endovascular stenting for treatment of intracranial aneurysms is associated with a lower incidence of ischemic events and a lower incidence of unfavorable neurological outcomes, especially when used in combination therapy.

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