Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of the designer drug 4-methylamphetamine on core temperature and serotonin levels in the striatum and hippocampus of rats.

Neuroscience Letters 2024 March 22
New psychoactive substances (NPS) are typically synthesized in clandestine laboratories in an attempt to chemically modify already federally regulated drugs in an effort to circumvent the law. Drugs derived from a phenethylamine pharmacophore, such as 4-chloroamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), reliably induce thermogenesis and serotonergic deficits in the striatum and hippocampus of rodents. 4-methylamphetamine (4-MA), a relative newcomer to the NPS scene, was originally investigated in the mid-1900 s as a potential anorexigenic agent. With its phenethylamine pharmacophore, 4-MA was hypothesized to produce similar toxicological alterations as its chemical analogs. In the present study, three doses (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg, ip.) of 4-MA were administered to rats twice daily for two days. Core temperature data were calculated and analyzed as temperature area under the curve (TAUC). On the second day of dosing, a hypothermic response to 4-MA (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) was noted between 0.5 and 2.0 h post-treatment. Only the highest dose of 4-MA decreased body weight on the second day of treatment and maintained this reduction in weight for seven days after treatment ceased. None of the doses of 4-MA evaluated significantly altered serotonin levels in the hippocampus or striatum seven days after final treatment. The present findings demonstrate that the 4-methyl substitution to amphetamine generates a pharmacological and toxicological profile that differs from other similar phenethylamine analogs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app