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Global burden of diseases attributable to intimate partner violence: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019.

PURPOSE: Our study aims to evaluate the global burden of disease attributable to IPV from 1990 to 2019 at global, regional, national, and socio-demographic index (SDI) levels. Our research question is: What is the global burden of disease attributable to intimate partner violence (IPV) from 1990 to 2019, and how does it vary at global, regional, national, and socio-demographic index (SDI) levels?

METHODS: Data parameters for the number of deaths, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and age-standardized rate were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. We calculated the percentage change and population attributable fraction with 95% uncertainty intervals.

RESULTS: IPV directly accounted for 0.14% [95% UI 0.09%, 0.21%] and 0.32% [95% UI 0.17%, 0.49%] of global all-cause deaths and DALYs in 2019, respectively. The age-standardized deaths and DALYs rates of IPV increased by 12.83% and 4.00% respectively from 1990 to 2019. Women aged 35-39 and 30-34 had the highest deaths and DALYs rate respectively. The highest age-standardized rates of IPV-related deaths and DALYs were observed in Southern Sub-Saharan. Both of deaths and DALYs were high in low-socio-demographic Index (SDI) quintile in 2019.

CONCLUSIONS: A higher level of deaths and DALYs attributable to IPV were reported in younger women, in the early 2000s, in Southern Sub-Saharan regions and in low SDI regions. Our study provides policymakers with up-to-date and comprehensive information.

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