Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Natural history of periodontal disease: The original Sri Lanka and Oslo studies.

Periodontology 2000 2024 March 23
Susceptibility to periodontal disease depends on individual factors within the host response to the bacterial challenge. The study of these factors requires longitudinal studies of an undisturbed development of the disease process. On the basis of the original longitudinal studies on the natural histology of periodontal disease staged in Sri Lanka and Oslo/Norway, several analyses of periodontal parameters and tooth status have been performed. The main findings were that in the first 20 years of complete absence of oral hygiene practices or preventive services attachment was lost at various rates. Three groups of subjects could be identified: rapidly progressing (RP) (8%), moderately progressing (MP) (81%), and subjects with no disease progression (NP) (11%). In the second two decades, the RP subjects have lost most of their teeth and no NP patients were identified anymore. The progression rate in these two decades was much slower, and the tooth mortality decreased. It could be predicted that subjects who had lost more than 2 mm at age 30 would not maintain a functional dentition at age 60. The corresponding control population in Oslo was used to study the influence of gingival inflammation on the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. The pattern and rates of attachment loss were identified in a population that was exposed to optimal and regular preventive services from age 3 onward. In the observation period of 26 years, it could be demonstrated that gingival inflammation varied little throughout adult life and always bleeding sites occurred consistently in 10% to 20%. The role of ongoing gingivitis in the pathogenesis of attachment loss was identified and also reflected stability whenever it was absent. Tooth mortality was only found in subjects with ongoing gingivitis. After 50 years of tooth age, 63% of the teeth were still maintained, while 99.8% were maintained after 50 years when gingival inflammation had been absent. Consequently, continuous gingivitis represented a risk factor for tooth loss.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app