Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Balloon dilatation for congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia.

PURPOSE: Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) is rare, and no standard treatment has been established. We reviewed cases of EA-associated CES to assess the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes, especially the feasibility of endoscopic dilatation.

METHODS: We retrospectively examined patients with EA-associated CES. We also compared treatment outcomes of EA-associated CES with those of EA patients without CES who developed postoperative anastomotic stricture.

RESULTS: Among 44 patients with EA, ten had CES (23%). Postoperative complications were not significantly different between EA patients with CES and those without CES but with anastomotic stricture. All CES patients underwent balloon dilatation as initial treatment. Eight of nine patients (89%) were successfully treated by dilatation only, and one patient underwent surgical resection. The median number of balloon dilatations for CES was five (2-17), which was higher than that for anastomotic stricture in patients without CES (p = 0.012). Esophageal perforation occurred in five patients with CES (5/9, 56%) after dilatation, but all perforations were successfully managed conservatively with an uneventful post-dilatation course.

CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-three percent of patients with EA had CES. Although balloon dilatation for EA-associated CES required multiple treatments and carried a risk of perforation, balloon dilatation showed an 89% success rate and all perforations could be managed conservatively.

Full text links

We have located open access text paper links.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app