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Children with Hirschsprung disease exhibited alterations in host-microbial co-metabolism after pull-through operation.

PURPOSE: This study aims to compare the fecal metabolome in post pull-through HD with and without HAEC patients and healthy young children using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

METHODS: Fresh fecal samples were collected from children under 5 years of age in both post-pull-through HD patients and healthy Thai children. A total of 20 fecal samples were then analyzed using NMR spectroscopy.

RESULTS: Thirty-four metabolites identified among HD and healthy children younger than 5 years were compared. HD samples demonstrated a significant decrease in acetoin, phenylacetylglutamine, and N-acetylornithine (corrected p value = 0.01, 0.04, and 0.004, respectively). Succinate and xylose significantly decreased in HD with HAEC group compared to HD without HAEC group (corrected p value = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). Moreover, glutamine and glutamate metabolism, and alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism were the significant pathways involved, with pathway impact 0.42 and 0.50, respectively (corrected p value = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively).

CONCLUSION: Differences in class, quantity, and metabolism of protein and other metabolites in young children with HD after pull-through operation were identified. Most of the associated metabolic pathways were correlated with the amino acids metabolism, which is required to maintain intestinal integrity and function.

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