Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Volar Locking Plating of Extra-articular Distal Radius Fracture: A Retrospective Clinical Study Comparing Locking Screws versus Smooth Locking Pegs.

Background  Open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures is one of the most common procedures performed in wrist surgery. The use of volar locking plate has gained increasing interest in the past decade. Epiphyseal fixation can be done either with locking screws or smooth locking pegs, with no evidence supporting the use of one rather than the other. Purpose  The aim of this study is to compare the stability of distal radius fixation by volar locking plate using locking screws or smooth locking pegs. Methods  Adult patients with A2-A3 AO fractures treated with a volar plate with locking screws only or smooth locking pegs only were retrospectively included. Radiographic assessment was performed to evaluate extra-articular parameters in the intraoperative postreduction and fixation period and after bony healing. Forty-seven distal radius fractures were included. Results  Twenty-four fractures had fixation with locking screws and 23 had fixation with smooth locking pegs. For both groups, all radiographic parameters measured showed a statistically significant difference between the intraoperative postreduction and fixation period and the remote postoperative period after union of the fracture ( p  < 0.05) attesting a slight loss of reduction. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences between the groups in radiographic extra-articular parameters. Conclusion  This clinical study shows that there is no difference in stability fixation between locking screws or smooth locking pegs in A2-A3 distal radius fractures. Clinical Relevance  The use of smooth locking pegs only for epiphyseal fixation appears to be safe in volar plating of A2-A3 distal radius fractures in adult patients and could be an alternative to locking screws. More clinical data are needed to confirm these results. Level of Evidence  Level III; retrospective comparative study.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app