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Crosstalk between COVID-19 and the gut-brain axis: a gut feeling.

The microbes in the gut are crucial for maintaining the body's immune system and overall gut health. However, it is not fully understood how an unstable gut environment can lead to more severe cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The gut microbiota also plays a role in the gut-brain axis and interacts with the central nervous system through metabolic and neuroendocrine pathways. The interaction between the microbiota and the host's body involves hormonal, immune, and neural pathways, and any disruption in the balance of gut bacteria can lead to dysbiosis, which contributes to pathogen growth. In this context, we discuss how dysbiosis could contribute to comorbidities that increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. Probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation have successfully treated infectious and non-infectious inflammatory-related diseases, the most common comorbidities. These treatments could be adjuvant therapies for COVID-19 infection by restoring gut homeostasis and balancing the gut microbiota.

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