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Identification of core gene in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and correlations with inflammation-related genes.

OBJECTIVE: Our aim in this study is to identify the core genes of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and analyze the correlations between it and inflammation-related genes.

METHODS: GSE72713 dataset containing gene expression data of ECRSwNP, nonECRSwNP and healthy samples was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and filtered by limma to identify DEGs among three groups, then the functions and correlated pathways of DEGs were analyzed using GO and KEGG. The core DEGs were selected by the intersection of DEGs and the PPI network was constructed via STRING. The correlations between the expression levels of CRSwNP core gene and inflammation-related genes were analyzed via the Mann-Whitney U test.

RESULTS: The DEGs among ECRSwNP, nonECRSwNP, and CTRL were filtered respectively, and enrichment analysis showed they were associated with olfaction and/or immune responses. The PPI network was constructed by 7 core DEGs obtained via the intersection among three groups, and ALOX15 was confirmed as the core gene in the network. Subsequently, the correlations between the expression levels of ALOX15 and inflammation-related genes were illustrated.

CONCLUSION: In this study, the core gene ALOX15 was selected from the DEGs among ECRSwNP, nonECRSwNP, and CTRL. IL5, IL1RL1, and IL1RAP were found to exhibit a significant positive correlation with ALOX15.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3.

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