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Significant association of HLA-A26 with uveitis and gastrointestinal involvement in patients with Behçet's disease in a multicenter study.

Modern Rheumatology 2024 March 15
OBJECTIVES: Specific HLA haplotypes are associated with Behçet's disease (BD). Because the effects of HLA-A26 and its combination with HLA-B51 on organ involvement in BD have not been well demonstrated, we aimed to examine them.

METHODS: This multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study enrolled patients with BD who visited Kyoto University Hospital between 2018 and 2021 or Kurashiki Central Hospital between 2006 and 2016 (n = 200). Disease severity was evaluated using the Krause score.

RESULTS: Uveitis and gastrointestinal involvement were observed in 95/196 and 57/167 patients, respectively. The HLA alleles identified were HLA-B51 (n = 52/106), HLA-A26 (n = 25/88), and HLA-B51 and HLA-A26 (n = 6/88). In patients harboring HLA-B51, the presence of HLA-A26 was associated with higher frequencies of uveitis (p = 0.03) and coexistence of uveitis and gastrointestinal involvement (p = 0.002), and higher Krause scores (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the presence of HLA-A26 was associated with a higher frequency of uveitis in patients with gastrointestinal involvement (p = 0.001) and gastrointestinal involvement in patients with uveitis (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Since specific HLA haplotypes and their combinations are associated with organ involvement, both HLA-A and HLA-B haplotypes should be confirmed when screening for affected organs.

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