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Treatable Traits in Pregnant Women with Asthma.

BACKGROUND: Asthma is the most common chronic respiratory disease in pregnancy, affecting approximately 8-10% of pregnant women. Uncontrolled asthma is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including low birth weight, preterm birth, and maternal complications such as pre-eclampsia.

SUMMARY: A current approach to the management of chronic airway diseases is based on targeting treatable traits. The aim of this review was to define treatable traits in pregnant women with asthma based on recent literature and to determine personalized treatment options according to these traits. Traits addressed in this review that may improve asthma control and pregnancy outcomes are fractional exhaled nitric oxide-based asthma monitoring and treatment, medication adherence and inhalation technique, impaired lung function, smoking cessation and comorbidity including psychological conditions (depression and anxiety), obesity, rhinitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic rhinosinusitis with or without nasal polyps, and sleep apnea.

KEY MESSAGES: All the treatable traits discussed have the potential to improve asthma control and pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with asthma. Further research is needed to determine which management approaches are best to improve asthma control during pregnancy, to identify other relevant treatable traits, and to determine whether the treatable trait approach is feasible and beneficial in pregnant women with asthma.

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