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Associations Between Obesity-Related Gene MC4R rs17782313 Locus Polymorphism and Components of Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Objective: It is well established that melanocortin-4 receptor ( MC4R ) rs17782313 locus polymorphism is associated with increased obesity risk and that obesity is strongly associated with an enhanced risk of all metabolic syndrome (MS) components. Thus, in this study, we examined the association between the MC4R rs17782313 locus polymorphism and the risk of the remaining MS components, namely, diabetes, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and hypertriglyceridemia. Methods: We performed an extensive literature screening across six scientific databases, namely, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Medline, ScienceDirect, CNKI, and WanFang employing a specific search strategy. Eligible studies were selected for inclusion in our meta-analysis, and odds ratio (OR) values and 95% confidence interval (CI) were computed through fixed- or random-effects models to examine correlation strength. In addition, we performed subgroup analyses involving adjustment factors (unadjusted body mass index [BMI], adjusted BMI), race (Caucasian, Asian), and source of controls (population, hospital). Results: Twenty-two eligible studies were selected from 846 articles, involving 28,018 patients and 98,994 normal participants. Based on this meta-analysis, the MC4R rs17782313 locus polymorphism was associated with an augmented risk of diabetes (allele contrast model T vs. C: OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03-1.08; dominant model TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03-1.11) and hypertension (dominant model TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.03-1.31) risk. However, based on this analysis, the MC4R rs17782313 locus polymorphism was not associated with low HDL and hypertriglyceridemia risk. Conclusions: Based on this analysis, the MC4R rs17782313 locus polymorphism is associated with enhanced risks of diabetes and hypertension, while the associations with low HDL and hypertriglyceridemia require further exploration.

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