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Comparative Analysis of Pediatric Brucellosis Cases With and Without Bacteremia.

Introduction: Brucellosis, which is among the endemic regions of Turkey, is a common zoonotic disease. The gold standard in diagnosing brucellosis is culture. We aimed to compare demographic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical and laboratory variables between cases with culture positivity and undetected in culture. Materials and Methods: This single-center study was conducted between January 2007 and April 2022. Clinical and laboratory data of patients with brucella growth in blood culture and patients without growth were compared. Results: A total of 150 patients were included in the study. The median age was 10 (1-18 years). Of the patients, 66 (44%) were female and 84 (56%) were male. Forty (26.7%) of the patients were bacteremic and 110 (73.3%) were nonbacteremic. In the bacteremic group, white blood cell count, platelet, and hemoglobin counts were lower, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values were higher. In clinical evaluation, fever, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, and abdominal pain were more common in the bacteremic group. Conclusion: The distinction between bacteremic and nonbacteremic brucellosis can be predicted using laboratory values such as white blood cells, hemoglobin counts, platelet, ALT, and AST, and clinical findings such as fever, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly.

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