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Risk of permanent pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Which factors are most relevant?

World Journal of Cardiology 2024 Februrary 27
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a formidable treatment option for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis ahead of surgical aortic valve replacement. The encouraging results from large randomized controlled trials has resulted in an exponential rise in the use of TAVR even in the low-risk patients. However, this is not without challenges. Need for permanent pacemaker (PPM) post-TAVR remains the most frequent and clinically relevant challenge. Naturally, identifying risk factors which predispose an individual to develop high grade conduction block post-TAVR is important. Various demographic factors, electrocardiographic features, anatomic factors and procedural characteristics have all been linked to the development of advanced conduction block and need for PPM following TAVR. Amongst these electrophysiological variables, most notably a prolonged QRS > 120 ms regardless of the type of conduction block seems to be one of the strongest predictors on logistic regression models. The index study by Nwaedozie et al highlights that patients requiring PPM post-TAVR had higher odds of having a baseline QRS > 120 ms and were more likely to be having diabetes mellitus that those who did not require PPM.

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