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Survivin expression is associated with lymph node metastasis and short survival in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Survivin, a protein belonging to the Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, is the smallest member in terms of size. It works by preventing programmed cell death and regulating the advancement of the cell cycle. Being a part of the group of inhibitors associated with apoptosis, survivin is connected to increased aggression and negative prognosis in different malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pathology tissue blocks of 209 primary tumors, and 44 adenomas, were used in this study, as well as an anti-Survivin antibody. A semiquantitative method was used to score the Survivin expression based on an evaluation of the percentage and intensity of nuclear expression.

RESULT: Survivin expression was identified in 127 (60.8%) CRC samples and in 14 adenomas (31.8%). There was an association between positive Survivin immunostaining and lymph node metastasis ( P : 0.001), lymphovascular invasion ( P : 0.020), and short overall survival (Log-rank 4.012, P=0.045) and disease-free survival probabilities (Log Rank 4.921, P=0.027). There was no association between Survivin expression and age, gender, tumor location, size, stage, margin status, and tumor recurrence.

CONCLUSION: Survivin immune expression is associated with worse prognoses in CRC patients. Survivin can be a potential disease biomarker and could be used in management plans for CRC patients.

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