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Management of Acne in Pregnancy.

Acne is one of the most common dermatological conditions to affect women of childbearing age, so it is important to consider the safety of long-term acne treatments on women who could become pregnant. In this review article, we clarify what management options are available to treat acne during pregnancy. Topical treatments, typically first-line for acne, such as azelaic acid, clindamycin, erythromycin, metronidazole, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, dapsone, and retinoids, were reviewed. Systemic treatments, such as zinc supplements, cephalexin, cefadroxil, amoxicillin, azithromycin, erythromycin, and corticosteroids, typically second-line for acne, were also reviewed. Alternative treatments such as light therapy and cosmetic procedures were also evaluated. Due to recommendation of sunscreen utilization during acne treatments, sunscreen usage during pregnancy was also assessed. Management of acne during unplanned pregnancy was discussed in further detail regarding safety and adverse effects. Through summarized tables and examples of studies demonstrating safety and efficacy of treatments, the following is a resource for providers and patients to utilize for management of acne during pregnancy.

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