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Profiles of disordered eating behaviour in type 1 diabetes using the DEPS-R and behaviour and glycaemic outcomes in a real-life setting.

AIMS: The Diabetes Eating Problems Survey - Revised (DEPS-R) is commonly used to assess disordered eating behaviour (DEB) in individuals with type 1 diabetes and has advantages compared to other measures not specifically tailored to diabetes. A score ≥20 on the DEPS-R is used to indicate clinically significant DEB; however, it does not distinguish between eating disorder (ED) phenotypes necessary to guide treatment decisions, limiting clinical utility.

METHODS: The current study used latent class analysis to identify distinct person-centred profiles of DEB in adults with type 1 diabetes using the DEPS-R. Analysis of Variance with Games Howell post-hoc comparisons was then conducted to examine the correspondence between the profiles and binge eating, insulin restriction and glycaemic control (HbA1c , mean blood glucose, and percent time spent in hyperglycaemia) during 3 days of assessment in a real-life setting.

RESULTS: Latent class analysis indicated a 4-class solution, with patterns of item endorsement suggesting the following profiles: Bulimia, Binge Eating, Overeating and Low Pathology. Differences in binge eating, insulin restriction and glycaemic control were observed between profiles during 3 days of at-home assessment. The Bulimia profile was associated with highest HbA1c and 3-day mean blood glucose.

CONCLUSIONS: There are common patterns of responses on the DEPS-R that appear to reflect different ED phenotypes. Profiles based on the DEPS-R corresponded with behaviour in the real-life setting as expected and were associated with different glycaemic outcomes. Results may have implications for the use of the DEPS-R in research and clinical settings.

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