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Alveolar Microlithiasis with Mild Clinical Symptoms But Severe Imaging Findings: A Case Report.

Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare genetic disorder that causes calcium phosphate microliths to form in the alveoli. Symptoms usually appear in a person's third or fourth decade of life. A definitive diagnosis does not always demand a lung biopsy but can be achieved in families with more than one member with PAM and compatible chest imaging. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman referred to us for shortness of breath. Chest imaging revealed bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacities, interlobar fissure calcification, and subpleural linear calcifications, leading to a diagnosis of PAM. Although there is no specific treatment for this condition, early diagnosis can help prevent it from progressing rapidly by avoiding exposure to risk factors.

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