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Psychometric properties of the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised among Dutch adults with type 1 diabetes and implications for clinical use.

AIMS: Disordered eating behaviour (DEB) in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be screened with the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised (DEPS-R). This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the DEPS-R among Dutch adults with T1D and to explore the individual items alongside the standard cut-off score of ≥20 for clinical use.

METHODS: The construct validity of the DEPS-R was assessed with an exploratory factor analysis, through principal axis factoring and with Spearman correlations between clinical variables and the DEPS-R. Backward logistic regression identified clinical predictors for DEPS-R scores above the cut-off. DEPS-R item responses were summarized with frequencies, means and standard deviations.

RESULTS: Participants were 145 adults with T1D, of whom 79.3% were women and 35.9% presented with DEB based on the cut-off. A single-factor solution of the DEPS-R showed good internal consistency, while a three-factor solution showed acceptable to good internal consistency within the factors. A younger age, a higher BMI and more diabetes distress were predictors for a DEPS-R cut-off score of ≥20. Clinically relevant items were identified that contributed minimally to the DEPS-R score.

CONCLUSIONS: This study supports a single-factor and a three-factor structure of the DEPS-R while also suggesting an item-specific or factor-specific approach in clinical practice.

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