Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Trends in AAA Repair in Australia Over Twenty Years.

BACKGROUND: The advent of endovascular techniques has revolutionised the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Many countries have seen a transition from open AAA repair (OAR) to endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) over the past 25 years. The only study done in Australia that describes this change was done in the private sector. Majority of healthcare in Australia is delivered through the public, universal healthcare system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends in AAA repair in the Australian public sector over the past two decades.

METHODS: The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) Procedures Data Cubes from the National Hospitals Data Collection was used to extract data pertaining to AAA repairs from 2000 to 2021. Population data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics was used to calculate incidence of each type of repair per 100,000 population.

RESULTS: There were 65,529 AAA repairs performed in the Australian public sector from 2000 to 2021. EVARs accounted for 64.4% (42,205) and OARs accounted for 35.6% (23, 324) of them. EVAR surpassed OAR as the preferred method of AAA repair in 2006. This trend was observed in both males and females and across all age groups.

CONCLUSION: There was a consistent and steady transition from OAR to EVAR over the 21 year period with EVAR surpassing OAR as the preferred method of AAA repair relatively early in Australia compared to other countries. Further research that investigates medium- and long-term outcomes of newer stent grafts is needed to further ascertain the continued viability and effectiveness of this trend in AAA treatment.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app