Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Association Between Augmentation Index and Total Sleep Time in Night Shift Workers.

Augmentation index and pulse wave velocity are markers of vascular compromise and independent predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality. While the link between shift work and heightened cardiovascular risk is established, the intricate genesis of early cardiovascular outcomes in shift workers remains incompletely understood. However, there is evidence that sleep duration plays a role in this regard. Here we evaluate the association of total sleep time with pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and central blood pressure in night shift workers. This study cross-sectionally evaluated the association of total sleep time evaluated by 10-day monitoring actigraphy with augmentation index, pulse wave velocity, and brachial and central blood pressure evaluated by oscillometry in nursing professionals, 63 shift workers (89% women; age = 45.0 ± 10.5 years), and 17 (100% women; age = 41.8 ± 15.6) day workers. There were no differences in the studied variables between shift workers and day workers. Results of correlation analysis demonstrated that pulse wave velocity, central systolic blood pressure, central diastolic blood pressure, brachial systolic blood pressure, and brachial diastolic blood pressure tended to have significant correlation with each other, while these measures did not have a significant relationship with augmentation index in both groups. However, results of adjusted restricted cubic spline analysis showed a U-shaped-curve association between total sleep time and augmentation index ( p  < 0.001 for trend) with a nadir at 300-360 min of total sleep time in shift workers. The present study showed that total sleep time, assessed by actigraphy, had a U-shaped association with augmentation index in shift workers, which indicated better characteristics of vascular functionality when sleep time was 5-6 h in the workers studied.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app