Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Mood disorders in adults with epilepsy: a review of unrecognized facts and common misconceptions.

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic conditions. Its clinical manifestations are not restricted to seizures but often include cognitive disturbances and psychiatric disorders. Prospective population-based studies have shown that people with epilepsy have an increased risk of developing mood disorders, and people with a primary mood disorder have an increased risk of developing epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms in epilepsy and mood disorders may explain the bidirectional relation between these two conditions. Recognition of a personal and family psychiatric history at the time of evaluation of people for a seizure disorder is critical in the selection of antiseizure medications: those with mood-stabilizing properties (e.g., lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine) should be favoured as a first option in those with a positive history while those with negative psychotropic properties (e.g., levetiracetam, topiramate) avoided. While mood disorders may be clinically identical in people with epilepsy, they often present with atypical manifestations that do not meet ICD or DSM diagnostic criteria. Failure to treat mood disorders in epilepsy may have a negative impact, increasing suicide risk and iatrogenic effects of antiseizure medications and worsening quality of life. Treating mood disorders in epilepsy is identical to those with primary mood disorders. Yet, there is a common misconception that antidepressants have proconvulsant properties. Most antidepressants are safe when prescribed at therapeutic doses. The incidence of seizures is lower in people randomized to antidepressants than placebo in multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trials of people treated for a primary mood disorder. Thus, there is no excuse not to prescribe antidepressant medications to people with epilepsy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app