Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Impact of SARS-COV-2 Infection on Maternal, Obstetric and Neonatal Outcomes in a Cohort of Vaccinated Women: A Pilot Study.

We aimed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 infection on maternal characteristics and obstetric and neonatal outcomes in a cohort of women in labor previously vaccinated who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection, compared to aged-matched healthy controls. A retrospective case-control study was conducted among 66 women in labor. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. The attendance rates at childbirth and parenting classes, as well as the implementation of a birth plan, were significantly lower in the COVID-19 infection group (6.1% vs. 48.5%, <0.001; 6.1% vs. 33.3%, p = .005, respectively). Women with COVID-19 had a higher prevalence of prolonged postpartum hospital stay (33.3% vs. 9.1%, p = .016), and significantly higher prevalence of spontaneous preterm birth (27.3% vs. 1.09%, p = .006). Breastfeeding within the first 24 hr was also lower in women with COVID-19 (72.7% vs. 97.0%, p = .006). Maternal characteristics and neonatal outcomes are influenced by COVID-19 infection in vaccinated women. Complications include spontaneous preterm birth, prolonged postpartum hospital stay, and lack of breastfeeding within the first 24 hr. Childbirth education, parenting classes and implementing a birth plan may be associated with a decreased risk of COVID-19 infection.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app