Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Dissemination of Urinary Escherichia coli Phylogroup B2 in Provincial and Community Hospitals in Uthai Thani, Central Thailand.

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that prominently causes a variety of clinical infections in humans, such as diarrhea, sepsis, and urinary tract infection. This bacterium is a common multidrug-resistant threat in community and hospital settings worldwide. This study examined the antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic relationship based on Clermont phylotyping and ERIC-PCR of 84 E. coli urinary isolates from provincial and community hospitals in Thailand. All the isolates were completely susceptible to nitrofurantoin, whereas almost all isolates were susceptible to carbapenem, fosfomycin, and amikacin. A high resistance rate was found to fluoroquinolone, ampicillin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Clermont phylogroup B2 was predominant (n=58). Subtyping of the B2 phylogroup revealed diverse subgroups, of which subgroup V (n=11) was predominant, followed by VII (n=9), III (n=6), and II (n=6). ERIC-PCR showed the strain of the B2 subgroups III and V were spread between provincial and community hospitals and between hospital wards. This evidence suggested the need for comprehensive infection control monitoring, with strong active surveillance at all hospital levels.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app