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Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Review of Research From 2011 to 2021.

Dissociative identity disorder (DID) has historically been one of the most controversial topics in the study of psychopathology. Building on a previous review of empirical research on DID from 2000 to 2010, the present review examined DID research from 2011 to 2021. The research output included 56 case studies and 104 empirical studies. Within the empirical studies, approximately 1354 new cases of DID emerged, which resulted in an average samples of approximately 20. Reanalysis of previous samples was standard in the literature with only 40% of reported cases being new. Studies emerged from dozens of countries across the world, but the majority of cases were from Western counties, especially the United States. Diagnosis primarily relied upon validated measures, but 74% of all new cases came from six research groups. Overall, research on DID is steady but methodologically limited in ways that make generalization, especially about etiology, difficult.

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