Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Serine/threonine-protein kinase D2-mediated phosphorylation of DSG2 threonine 730 promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression.

Journal of Pathology 2024 Februrary 28
Desmoglein-2 (DSG2) is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the desmosomal cadherin family, which mediates cell-cell junctions; regulates cell proliferation, migration, and invasion; and promotes tumor development and metastasis. We previously showed serum DSG2 to be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), although the significance and underlying molecular mechanisms were not identified. Here, we found that DSG2 was increased in ESCC tissues compared with adjacent tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that DSG2 promoted ESCC cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, using interactome analysis, we identified serine/threonine-protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) as a novel DSG2 kinase that mediates the phosphorylation of DSG2 at threonine 730 (T730). Functionally, DSG2 promoted ESCC cell migration and invasion dependent on DSG2-T730 phosphorylation. Mechanistically, DSG2 T730 phosphorylation activated EGFR, Src, AKT, and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, DSG2 and PRKD2 were positively correlated with each other, and the overall survival time of ESCC patients with high DSG2 and PRKD2 was shorter than that of patients with low DSG2 and PRKD2 levels. In summary, PRKD2 is a novel DSG2 kinase, and PRKD2-mediated DSG2 T730 phosphorylation promotes ESCC progression. These findings may facilitate the development of future therapeutic agents that target DSG2 and DSG2 phosphorylation. © 2024 The Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app