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Side effects of treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and the occurrence of depressive symptoms.

INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to check whether individual side effects of treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) contribute to the occurrence of depressive symptoms. In addition, it was decided to check whether there is any correlation between the age, sex, and duration of treatment and the intensity of depressive symptoms, in relation to the occurrence of individual side effects.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 91 patients with CML treated with TKI. The following questionnaires were used: a questionnaire created by the author, David Goldberg's general health questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), and the four-dimensional symptom questionnaire (4DSQ).

RESULTS: Our research showed that fatigue (β = 0.27; p = 0.007), nausea/indigestion (β = 0.26; p = 0.008), bone and joint pain (β = 0.21; p = 0.033), and abdominal pain (β = 0.33; p ≤ 0.001) were the most common side effects of TKI treatment resulting in increased depressive symptoms. Age and duration of treatment had a significant impact on the severity of depressive symptoms in patients experiencing specific side effects of TKI treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the influence of the occurrence of TKI treatment side effects on the development of depressive symptoms. Patients' quality of life can be improved with the cooperation of medical staff in reducing/alleviating the side effects.

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