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Plasma metabolomics for diagnostic biomarkers on ectopic pregnancy.

Metabolomics is a relatively novel omics tool to provide potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the diseases and to insight the pathophysiology not having discussed ever before. In the present study, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was employed to the plasma samples of Group T1: Patients with ectopic pregnancy diagnosed using ultrasound, and followed-up with beta-hCG level ( n  = 40), Group T2: Patients with ectopic pregnancy diagnosed using ultrasound, underwent surgical treatment and confirmed using histopathology ( n  = 40), Group P: Healthy pregnant women ( n  = 40) in the first prenatal visit of pregnancy, Group C: Healthy volunteers ( n  = 40) scheduling a routine gynecological examination. Metabolite extraction was performed using 3 kDa pores - Amicon® Ultra 0.5 mL Centrifugal Filters. A gradient elution program (mobile phase composition was water and acetonitrile consisting of 0.1% formic acid) was applied using a C18 column (Agilent Zorbax 1.8 μM, 100 x 2.1 mm). Total analysis time was 25 min when the flow rate was 0.2 mL/min. The raw data was processed through XCMS - R program language edition where the optimum parameters detected using Isotopologue Parameter Optimization (IPO). The potential metabolites were identified using MetaboAnalyst 5.0 and finally 27 metabolites were evaluated to be proposed as potential biomarkers to be used for the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.

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