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Impact of preoperative prealbumin levels on long-term prognosis in patients with gastric cancer after gastrectomy: a retrospective cohort study.

Gastric Cancer 2024 Februrary 25
BACKGROUND: The relationship between preoperative prealbumin levels and long-term prognoses in patients with gastric cancer after gastrectomy has not been fully investigated. This study clarified the effect of preoperative prealbumin levels on the long-term prognosis of patients with gastric cancer after gastrectomy.

METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients who underwent radical gastrectomy for primary pStage I-III gastric cancer and whose preoperative prealbumin levels were measured between May 2006 and March 2017. Participants were categorized according to their preoperative prealbumin levels into high (≥22 mg/dL), moderate (15-22 mg/dL), and low (<15 mg/dL) groups. The overall survival (OS) in the three groups was compared using the log-rank test, and prognostic factors were identified using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.

RESULTS: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Of 4732 patients, 3649 (77.2%) were classified as high, 925 (19.6%) as moderate, and 158 (3.3%) as low. Lower prealbumin levels were associated with poorer prognoses (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that prealbumin levels of 15-22 mg/dL [hazard ratio (HR): 1.576, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.353-1.835, P < 0.001] and <15 mg/dL (HR: 1.769, 95% CI: 1.376-2.276, P < 0.001) were independent poor prognostic factors for OS. When analyzed according to the cause of death, prealbumin levels were associated with other-cause survival, but not cancer-specific survival.

CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative prealbumin levels correlated with OS in patients with gastric cancer after gastrectomy; the lower the prealbumin level, the worse is the prognosis. Prealbumin levels may be associated with other-cause survival.

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