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Synergistic Effects of High-Intensity Ultrasound Combined with L-Lysine for the Treatment of Porcine Myofibrillar Protein Regarding Solubility and Flavour Adsorption Capacity.

Foods (Basel, Switzerland) 2024 Februrary 20
This study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of high-intensity ultrasound (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min) in combination with L-lysine (15 mM) on improving the solubility and flavour adsorption capacity of myofibrillar proteins (MPs) in low-ion-strength media. The results revealed that the ultrasound treatment for 20 min or the addition of L-lysine (15 mM) significantly improved protein solubility ( p < 0.05), with L-lysine (15 mM) showing a more pronounced effect ( p < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound treatment and L-lysine further increased solubility, and the MPs treated with ultrasound at 20 min exhibited the best dispersion stability in water, which corresponded to the lowest turbidity, highest absolute zeta potential value, and thermal stability ( p < 0.05). Based on the reactive and total sulfhydryl contents, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis, the ultrasound treatment combined with L-lysine (15 mM) promoted the unfolding and depolymerization of MPs, resulting in a larger exposure of SH groups on the surface, aromatic amino acids in a polar environment, and a transition of protein conformation from α-helix to β-turn. Moreover, the combined treatment also increased the hydrophobic bonding sites, hydrogen-bonding sites, and electrostatic effects, thereby enhancing the adsorption capacity of MPs to bind kenone compounds. The findings from this study provide a theoretical basis for the production and flavour improvement of low-salt MP beverages and the utilisation of meat protein.

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