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Emulsification Characteristics of Insoluble Dietary Fibers from Pomelo Peel: Effects of Acetylation, Enzymatic Hydrolysis, and Wet Ball Milling.

Foods (Basel, Switzerland) 2024 Februrary 20
To improve the application potential of pomelo peel insoluble dietary fiber (PIDF) in emulsion systems, acetylation (PIDF-A), cellulase hydrolysis (PIDF-E), and wet ball milling (PIDF-M) were investigated in this paper as methods to change the emulsification properties of PIDF. The impact of the methods on PIDF composition, structure, and physicochemical properties was also assessed. The results demonstrated that both acetylation modification and cellulase hydrolysis could significantly improve the emulsification properties of PIDF. The emulsions stabilized with PIDF-A and PIDF-E could be stably stored at 25 °C for 30 d without phase separation at particle concentrations above 0.8% ( w / v ) and had higher storage stability: The D4,3 increments of PIDF-A- and PIDF-E-stabilized emulsions were 0.98 μm and 0.49 μm, respectively, at particle concentrations of 1.2% ( w / v ), while the storage stability of PIDF-M-stabilized emulsion (5.29 μm) significantly decreased compared with that of PIDF (4.00 μm). Moreover, PIDF-A showed the highest water retention capacity (21.84 g/g), water swelling capacity (15.40 mL/g), oil retention capacity (4.67 g/g), and zeta potential absolute (29.0 mV) among the PIDFs. In conclusion, acetylation modification was a promising method to improve the emulsifying properties of insoluble polysaccharides.

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