JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Bio-inspired carbon electrodes for metal-ion batteries.

Nanoscale 2024 Februrary 24
Carbon has been widely used as an electrode material in commercial metal-ion batteries (MIBs) because of its desirable electrical, mechanical, and physical properties. Still, traditional carbon electrodes suffer from limited mechanical stability and electrochemical performance in MIBs. Drawing inspiration from biological species, the carbon allotropes, such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, can be engineered into mechanically robust, highly conductive frameworks with enhanced ion storage and transport capabilities for MIBs. Here, we present an assortment of bio-inspired carbon electrodes that have enhanced the cycling stability, capacity retention, and overall performance of MIBs. In addition, mimicking the structure and functionality of biological systems has led to the development of flexible MIBs whose performance does not degrade even when stretched, bent, or twisted. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a useful guide in identifying such bio-inspired carbon frameworks because it can simulate and analyze potential failure scenarios, such as stress build-up or structural collapse in MIBs. This review highlights through several examples that there is much scope for improving carbon-based electrode materials through bio-inspired designs for practical high-performance MIBs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app