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Investigating the levels, spatial distribution, and trophic transfer patterns of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in the Southern Bohai Sea, China.

Water Research 2024 Februrary 19
The marine environment of the southern Bohai Sea is severely polluted by short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs). To improve understanding of how SCCPs occur and of how they migrate, are transformed, and transferred in this area, we collected seawater, sediment, and organism samples, and determined the SCCP contents using a new approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry. The ΣSCCP concentrations in the seawater, sediment, and organism samples ranged from 57.5 to 1150.4 ng/L, 167.7-1105.9 ng/g (dry weight), and 11.4-583.0 ng/g (wet weight), respectively. Simulation of the spatial distribution of SCCPs using Kriging interpolation showed that SCCPs were markedly influenced by land-based pollution. Substantial quantities of SCCPs were transported to the marine environment via surface runoff from rivers that passed through areas of major SCCP production. Once discharged from such rivers into the Bohai Sea, these SCCPs were further dispersed under the influence of ocean currents. Furthermore, the logarithmic bioaccumulation factor that varied from 2.12 to 3.20 and the trophic magnification factor that reached 5.60 (r2 = 0.750, p < 0.01) suggest that organisms have the ability to accumulate and biomagnify SCCPs through the food chain, which could potentially present risks to both marine ecosystems and human health.

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