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A rare cause of acute esophageal necrosis: A case report.

Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or black esophagus is a rare entity characterized by diffuse circumferential black pigmentation of the esophageal mucosa due to ischemic necrosis. It may be lethal, especially among elderly patients with multiple comorbidities and hemodynamic instability. Diagnosis is based on gastroscopy. Treatment consists of intravenous fluids, proton pump inhibitors, and additional therapies to treat the underlying illness. We report a rare case of a woman in her 50s with cervical cancer who presented with hematemesis and sepsis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a black esophagus and an ulcerobudding duodenal process. Few days later, she developed abdominal distension with diffuse pain. Abdominal CT scan demonstrated perforation of gastroduodenal tumor. The treatment was based on resuscitation, proton pump inhibitors, antibiotics, and surgery of the perforated tumor. Unfortunately, the patient died 2 days later because of septic shock. The black esophagus is a fatal complication, thus diagnosis at an early stage and timely management may improve survival. This is the first case reported of AEN due to perforated duodenal tumor explained by septic shock leading to an ischemic esophageal injury.

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