JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Common differential diagnosis of low back pain in contemporary medical practice: a narrative review.

With a wide range of etiologies, low back pain (LBP) presents a true clinical challenge, finding its origins both in intrinsic spinal and systemic conditions, as well as referred ones. This review categorizes the LBP into these three groups and aims to offer a comprehensive look at the tools required to diagnose and differentiate them. The intrinsic etiologies are based on conditions that affect the musculoskeletal components of the lumbar spine, such as intervertebral disc disease, stenosis, muscular imbalance, and facet joint degeneration. The systemic causes usually extend beyond local structures. Such are the cases of neoplasia, infections, and chronic inflammation. The diagnosis is rendered even more complex by adding the referred pain, which only manifests in the lower back yet arises in more distant locations. By synthesizing the literature that encompasses the problem, this review aims to augment the understanding of the differential diagnoses of LBP by showcasing the subject's nuances. This categorization provides a structured approach to a patient-centered diagnosis, which could facilitate the medical practitioners' efforts to navigate this pathology more effectively.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app