Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Reshaping the tumor microenvironment of cold soft-tissue sarcomas with oncolytic viral therapy: a phase 2 trial of intratumoral JX-594 combined with avelumab and low-dose cyclophosphamide.

Molecular Cancer 2024 Februrary 21
Most soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) exhibit an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), leading to resistance against immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) and limited therapeutic response. Preclinical data suggest that oncolytic viral therapy can remodel the TME, facilitating T cell accumulation and enhancing the immunogenicity of these tumors.We conducted the METROMAJX, a phase II clinical trial, to investigate the combination of JX-594, an oncolytic vaccinia virus engineered for selective tumor cell replication, with metronomic cyclophosphamide and the PD-L1 inhibitor avelumab in patients with advanced, 'cold' STS, characterized by an absence of tertiary lymphoid structures. The trial employed a two-stage Simon design. JX-594 was administered intratumorally at a dose of 1.109 pfu every 2 weeks for up to 4 intra-tumoral administrations. Cyclophosphamide was given orally at 50 mg twice daily in a week-on, week-off schedule, and avelumab was administered at 10 mg/kg biweekly. The primary endpoint was the 6-month non-progression rate.Fifteen patients were enrolled, with the most frequent toxicities being grade 1 fatigue and fever. Fourteen patients were assessable for efficacy analysis. At 6 months, only one patient remained progression-free, indicating that the trial did not meet the first stage endpoint of Simon's design. Analysis of sequential tissue biopsies and plasma samples revealed an increase in CD8 density and upregulation of immune-related protein biomarkers, including CXCL10.Intra-tumoral administration of JX-594 in combination with cyclophosphamide and avelumab is safe and capable of modulating the TME in cold STS. However, the limited efficacy observed warrants further research to define the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses, particularly in relation to specific histological subtypes of STS.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app