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Intracranial Hypertension Associated With Poly-Cranio-Radicular-Neuropathies: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Neurologist 2024 Februrary 20
INTRODUCTION: We present the case of a gentleman who developed rapidly progressive vision loss, ophthalmo-paresis, and flaccid quadriparesis in the context of severe intracranial hypertension. We reviewed the available cases in the literature to increase awareness of this rare clinical entity.Case Report:A 36-year-old man developed rapidly progressive vision loss, ophthalmo-paresis, and flaccid quadriparesis. He had an extensive workup, only notable for severe intracranial hypertension, >55 cm of H2O. No inflammatory features were present, and the patient responded to CSF diversion. Few similar cases are available in the literature, but all show markedly elevated intracranial pressure associated with extensive neuroaxis dysfunction. Similarly, these patients improved with CSF diversion but did not appear to respond to immune-based therapies.

CONCLUSIONS: We term this extensive neuroaxis dysfunction intracranial hypertension associated with poly-cranio-radicular-neuropathy (IHP) and distinguish it from similar immune-mediated clinical presentations. Clinicians should be aware of the different etiologies of this potentially devastating clinical presentation to inform appropriate and timely treatment.

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