Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Alcohol-related cognitive impairments in patients with and without cirrhosis.

Alcohol and Alcoholism 2024 January 18
AIMS: up to 80% of patients with alcohol use disorder display cognitive impairments. Some studies have suggested that alcohol-related cognitive impairments could be worsened by hepatic damage. The primary objective of this study was to compare mean scores on the Brief Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Impairments measure between alcohol use disorder patients with (CIR+) or without cirrhosis (CIR-).

METHODS: we conducted a prospective case-control study in a hepatology department of a university hospital. All patients were assessed using the Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neuropsychological Impairments test.

RESULTS: a total of 82 patients (50 CIR+, 32 CIR-) were included in this study. CIR- patients were significantly younger than CIR+ patients (respectively, 45.5 ± 6.8 vs 60.1 ± 9.0; P < .0001). After adjusting for age and educational level, the mean Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neuropsychological Impairments total scores in the CIR+ group were significantly lower than in the group of CIR- patients (14.1 ± 0.7 vs 7.8 ± 0.4, respectively, P < .0001). The mean subscores on delayed verbal memory, alphabetical ordination, alternating verbal fluency, visuospatial abilities, and ataxia subtests were also significantly lower in the CIR+ than in the CIR- group (respectively, 1.9 ± 0.2 vs 2.8 ± 0.2; 1.8 ± 0.2 vs 2.7 ± 0.2; 2.2 ± 0.2 vs 3.6 ± 0.2; 0.7 ± 0.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.2; 0.7 ± 0.2 vs 3.1 ± 0.2; P < .0001 for all comparisons).

CONCLUSIONS: in the present study, alcohol use disorder patients with cirrhosis presented more severe cognitive impairments than those without cirrhosis. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate how cirrhosis can influence cognitive impairments.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app