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The Impact of Dermatologic Adverse Events on the Quality of Life of Oncology Patients: A Review of the Literature.

Dermatologic adverse events resulting from oncologic therapy are common and negatively impact patients' quality of life. Dermatologic adverse events include toxicity of the skin, oral mucosa, nails, and hair and are seen with cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and radiation therapy, with distinct patterns of dermatologic adverse events by drug class. Here, we review the literature on the impact of dermatologic adverse events on quality of life. Studies on quality of life in patients with cancer have relied on scales such as the Dermatologic Life Quality Index and Skindex to demonstrate the association between dermatologic adverse events and declining quality of life. This relationship is likely due to a variety of factors, including physical discomfort, changes to body image, decreased self-esteem, and an effect on social interactions. Addressing such quality-of-life concerns for patients with cancer is critical, not only for patients' well-being but also because decreased satisfaction with treatment can lead to discontinuation of treatment or dose reduction. Prophylactic treatment and early management of dermatologic adverse events by experienced dermatologists can alleviate the negative effects on quality of life and allow continuation of life-prolonging treatment.

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