Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Adolescent social isolation increases binge-like alcohol drinking in male but not female high-alcohol-preferring mice.

Alcohol and Alcoholism 2024 January 18
AIMS: This study examined how adolescent social isolation affects adult binge-like alcohol drinking and stress-axis function, via basal levels of circulating corticosterone (CORT), in male and female mice with a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol preference (HAP).

METHODS: Male and female HAP2 mice were randomly assigned to a group-housed or social isolation (ISO) group. Social isolation began at postnatal Days 40-42 and lasted for 21 days prior to assessment of binge-like alcohol drinking using a 4-day drinking-in-the-dark (DID) procedure. Blood samples to assess basal CORT were taken 6 days after social isolation ended and 24 h before DID started, and again 60 h after DID ended, during the light portion of the light cycle.

RESULTS: Adolescent social isolation increased adult binge-like alcohol drinking in male but not female mice. All groups showed significantly lower CORT after DID compared to before DID. Pearson bivariate correlation coefficients between the first 2 h of grams-per-kilogram alcohol intake on Day 4 and CORT levels indicated a significant positive correlation in ISO males only after DID and negative correlations in ISO females before and after DID.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that adolescent social isolation increased binge-like alcohol drinking in male but not female adult HAP2 mice. Stress-axis adaptations in male HAP2 mice may be associated with the social-isolation-induced increase in binge-like alcohol drinking.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app