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Biomechanical analysis of cervical spine (C2-C7) at different flexed postures.

Musculoskeletal diseases are often related with postural changes in the neck region that can be caused by prolonged cervical flexion. This is one of the contributing factors. When determining the prevalence, causes, and related risks of neck discomfort, having a solid understanding of the biomechanics of the cervical spine (C1-C7) is absolutely necessary. The objective of this study is to make predictions regarding the intervertebral disc (IVD) stress values across C2-C7 IVD, the ligament stress, and the variation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of cervical neck angle using finite element analysis (FEA). In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the cervical spine (particularly, C2-C7), this investigation makes use of computed tomography (CT) scans to develop a three-dimensional FEA model of the cervical spine. A preload of 50 N compression force was applied at the apex of the C2 vertebra, and all degrees of freedom below the C7 level were constrained. The primary objective of this investigation is to assess the distribution of von Mises stress within the IVDs and ligaments spanning C2-C7 at various flexion angles: 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°, utilizing FEA. The outcomes derived from this analysis were subsequently compared to previously published experimental and FEA data to validate the model's ability to replicate the physiological motion of the cervical spine across different flexion angles.

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