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The efficacy of Pilates method in patients with hypertension: systematic review and meta-analysis.

This study aimed to systematically review the available evidence on the effects of Pilates training programs on blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Randomized clinical trials and comparative studies were searched in four electronic databases until September 2023 (updated December 2023). The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database and Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies scales. A total of 4 randomized clinical trials and 7 comparative studies were included, showing a low (n = 1), hight (n = 6), and good (n = 4) methodological quality. Data synthesis indicated that participants who performed Pilates program obtained significantly reduces on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, of -4.76 mmHg (95% CI: -6.55 to -2.97, p < 0.001) and -3.43 mmHg (95% CI: -4.37 to -2.49, p < 0.001), respectively, in comparison with those included in the comparison groups. When the analysis was performed by comparing hypertensive, and normotensive patients, the results remained non-significant for blood pressure (systolic blood pressure: 0.96 mmHg (95% CI: -2.85 to 4.77, P = 0.49); diastolic blood pressure: 1.18 mmHg (95% CI: -1.23 to 3.58, P = 0.34); mean blood pressure: 1.73 mmHg (95% CI: -1.96 to 5.42, P = 0.36). Evidence suggests Pilates is safe for hypertensive patients and can be part of their rehabilitation, but it may not necessarily offer superior results or improve exercise adherence compared to other modalities.

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