Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Hemolivia species infecting Central American wood turtles (Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima manni) and problems with differential diagnosis within the genus Hemolivia.

Blood parasites of the genus Hemolivia Petit, Landau, Baccam and Lainson, 1990 (Adeleorina: Karyolysidae) are hemogregarines of ectothermic vertebrates, such as lizards, chelonians, and toads. Only five species of Hemolivia from vertebrate hosts and one from their tick vector have been described so far. In the present study, Central American wood turtles (Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima manni) originating from Southern Nicaragua were screened for the presence of hemogregarines. Ten out of 30 specimens (33.3%) were positive for Hemolivia using both approaches - microscopy and PCR-based analyses. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 18S rRNA gene revealed the presence of two haplotypes, both placed as sister taxa in the Hemolivia clade. Their phylogenetic position was supported by high bootstrap values and high posterior probabilities, suggesting that there are at least two new distinct haplotypes corresponding to two distinct species. However, the specimens of each haplotype were microscopically indistinguishable from each other based on the gamont morphology, therefore, only a single species could be described and named, as Hemolivia pulcherrima n. sp. We consider that the uniform morphology of the most common blood stages of species of the genus Hemolivia complicates their differential diagnosis. Sequence divergence and different host spectra, therefore, remain the only differentiating tools.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app