Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The role of programmed death receptor (PD-)1/PD-ligand (L)1 in periodontitis and cancer.

Periodontology 2000 2024 Februrary 14
The programmed-death-ligand-1 (PD-L1) is an immune-modulating molecule that is constitutively expressed on various immune cells, different epithelial cells and a multitude of cancer cells. It is a costimulatory molecule that may impair T-cell mediated immune response. Ligation to the programmed-death-receptor (PD)-1, on activated T-cells and further triggering of the related signaling pathways can induce T-cells apoptosis or anergy. The upregulation of PD-L1 in various cancer types, including oral squamous cell carcinomas, was demonstrated and has been linked to immune escape of tumors and poor prognosis. A bidirectional relationship exists between the increased PD-L1 expression and periodontitis as well as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process of interconversion of epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells that may induce immune escape of tumors. Interaction between exosomal PD-L1 and PD-1 on T-cells may cause immunosuppression by blocking the activation and proliferation of T-cells. The efficacy and importance of treatment with PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors and their prognostic influence on human cancers was demonstrated. Regarding PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors, resistances exist or may develop, basing on various factors. Further investigations of the underlying mechanisms will help to overcome the therapeutic limitations that result from resistances and to develop new strategies for the treatment of cancer.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app