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Ageing and the gut-brain axis: lessons from the Drosophila model.

Beneficial Microbes 2023 December 14
The steady decline of physiological function and increased vulnerability to age-related disorders are two features of the complicated biological process of ageing. As a key organ for nutrient absorption, metabolism, and immunological regulation, the gut plays a major part in the ageing process. Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism, has emerged as a significant tool for exploring the intricate rapport between the gut and ageing. Through the use of Drosophila models, the physiological and molecular elements of the gut-brain axis have been thoroughly explored. These models have also provided insights into the mechanisms by which gut health impacts ageing and age-related illnesses. Drosophila's gut microbiota experience dysbiosis with age which has been linked to age-related diseases. To prevent this and promote healthy ageing in Drosophila, gut microbiota modification methods, such as dietary restriction in tandem with time-restricted feeding, administration of pro-, pre- and synbiotics, as well as pharmaceutical interventions have been generated with positive impacts. The article also covers the drawbacks and difficulties of investigating the gut via the Drosophila. Thus, with an emphasis on the lessons discovered from Drosophila research, this review provides an extensive description of the current studies on the role of the gut-brain axis in ageing and health.

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