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Multi-strain probiotic improves subjective sleep quality with no impact on body composition, hemodynamics, and physical activity.

Beneficial Microbes 2024 January 32
The objective of the study was to examine the impact of a multi-strain probiotic (MSP) on sleep, physical activity, and body composition changes. We used a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled approach with 70 healthy men and women (31.0 ± 9.5 years, 173.0 ± 10.4 cm, 73.9 ± 13.8 kg, 24.6 ± 3.5 kg/m2) supplemented daily with MSP (4 × 109 live cells Limosilactobacillus fermentum LF16, Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus LR06, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum LP01, and Bifidobacterium longum 04; Probiotical S.p.A., Novara, Italy) or placebo (PLA). In response to supplementation (after 0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks of supplementation) and 3 weeks after stopping supplementation, participants had subjective (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, PSQI) and objective sleep indicators, body composition, daily physical activity and resting hemodynamics assessed. Subjective sleep quality indicators using the PSQI (sleep latency, sleep disturbance, and global PSQI score) improved ( P < 0.05) at various time points with MSP supplementation. Systolic blood pressure in PLA increased ( P < 0.05) after 6 weeks of supplementation with no change in MSP. No changes ( P > 0.05) in sleep (hours asleep, minutes awake, number of times awake) or physical activity (step count, minutes of sedentary activity, total active minutes) metrics assessed by the wearable device were observed. Additionally, no changes in resting heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, and body composition were discerned. In conclusion, MSP supplementation improved the subjective ability to fall asleep faster and disturbances experienced during sleep, which resulted in improved overall sleep quality as assessed by the PSQI. No differences in other sleep indicators, physical activity, hemodynamics, and body composition were observed during or following MSP supplementation. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT05343533.

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