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Long-term results after surgical basal cell carcinoma excision in the eyelid region: revisited.

The aim of the study was to readdress basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the periocular region to prove the efficacy of histologically controlled surgical treatment and to identify high-risk characteristics.Retrospective analysis of 451 microscopically controlled BCC excisions in the periocular region. Tumor location, tumor size, AJCC 7 classification, and histological results were recorded. The same procedure was followed for recurrences.A recurrence rate of 5.0% was observed after the first microscopically controlled excision. Recurrent BCCs show a shift from nodular to sclerosing BCC as the primary histological type as well as a change in primary location from lower eyelid to medial canthus. The frequency of BCC with deep extension increased from 7.3% to 24.7%, and 57.1% after the second and third operations, respectively. The recurrence rate increased to 9.5% and 42.9%, after the second and third operations, respectively.In conclusion, we are facing the same challenges in surgical BCC treatment as 30 years ago. The distribution of periocular BCC location, histologic subtype and recurrence rates mirror the literature und the general consensus. The recurrence rate increases with every operation needed. Sclerosing BCCs with deep extension at the medial canthus bear the greatest risk for recurrence. In such cases, centers of expertise should be consulted and additional treatment options should be considered.

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