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Minimally invasive surgical approaches for spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in neonates aged 0-3 months.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to assess the clinical efficacy of minimally invasive surgical interventions in addressing spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage among neonates aged 0-3 months.

METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on a cohort of 30 neonates diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, who underwent minimally invasive cranial trepanation and drainage procedures at our department between 2011 and 2015.

RESULTS: A comprehensive follow-up, spanning a duration of 1-5 years, was conducted for all 30 neonates, revealing a 100% survival rate among the pediatric cohort.

CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that minimally invasive cranial trepanation and drainage exhibit efficacy in neonates aged 0-3 months experiencing spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, leading to a reduction in both mortality and disability rates. It is recommended that surgery be promptly performed upon definitive diagnosis and identification of operation indications to prevent severe brain damage resulting from prolonged intracranial hypertension and potential fatal outcomes in neonates. Furthermore, the surgical procedure is characterized by its simplicity, involving minimal trauma.

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