Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Why are females less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD in childhood than males?

ADHD is less likely to be diagnosed in females than males, especially in childhood. Females also typically receive the diagnosis later than males and are less likely to be prescribed ADHD medication. Understanding why these sex differences in clinical care and treatment for ADHD occur is key to improving timely diagnosis in people affected by ADHD. This Personal View is a conceptual review synthesising literature on this topic. This publication considers potential biological explanations (eg, genetic factors), influence of diagnostic practices (eg, criteria suitability, diagnostic overshadowing, and sex-specific diagnostic thresholds), and sociocultural explanations (eg, sex differences in presentation and compensatory behaviours), for the observed sex differences in ADHD clinical practice. This Personal View also outlines future research directions for improving understanding of sex differences in recognition and diagnosis of ADHD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app