Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Race effects on impression formation in social interaction: An instrumental learning account.

How does race influence the impressions we form through direct interaction? In two preregistered experiments ( N = 239/179), White American participants played a money-sharing game with Black and White players, based on a probabilistic reward reinforcement learning task, in which they chose to interact with players and received feedback on whether a player shared. We found that participants formed stronger reward preferences for White relative to Black players despite equivalent reward feedback between groups-a pattern that was stronger among participants with low internal motivation to respond without prejudice and high explicit prejudice. This race effect in reward learning was evident in participants' behavioral choice preferences, but not in their self-reported perceptions of group members' reward rates. Computational modeling suggested two mechanisms through which race affected instrumental learning: race (a) influenced White participants' initial expectancies (i.e., priors) about Black compared with White players' behavior and (b) led participants to update reward representations of Black and White players according to separate learning rates. These findings demonstrate that race can influence the formation of impressions through direct social interaction and introduce an instrumental learning framework to understand the effects of bias in intergroup interactions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app